“Number 59 and her offspring on the loose!”

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Special report:  Four-legged prisoner #59 was spotted September 16, 2014, near marker #12 at the Ridgefield NWR.  In cahoots with #59 were her two terrifying offspring, one of which is pictured here and looking very suspicious–actually, both have guilty looks on their faces.  As this picture was taken, the two escapees were deciding whether to run left or right–turns out they ran to the right and disappeared into the long grass.  #59 was previously convicted of making off with an official refuge tracking radio, which is clearly evident as the animal has it hanging on her neck, in plain sight (silly girl!).  Please call the authorities if you happen to spot these mischievous critters!

Columbian White-tailed Deer (all blinged out) and her young.          Canon 5D Mark III, 1/1250, f4, ISO 2000, 500mm, 8:00 a.m.

Posted in

Special report:  Four-legged prisoner #59 was spotted September 16, 2014, near marker #12 at the Ridgefield NWR.  In cahoots with #59 were her two terrifying offspring, one of which is pictured here and looking very suspicious–actually, both have guilty looks on their faces.  As this picture was taken, the two escapees were deciding whether to run left or right–turns out they ran to the right and disappeared into the long grass.  #59 was previously convicted of making off with an official refuge tracking radio, which is clearly evident as the animal has it hanging on her neck, in plain sight (silly girl!).  Please call the authorities if you happen to spot these mischievous critters!

Columbian White-tailed Deer (all blinged out) and her young.          Canon 5D Mark III, 1/1250, f4, ISO 2000, 500mm, 8:00 a.m.

2 thoughts on ““Number 59 and her offspring on the loose!””

  1. Awhhh so cute and so sad all at the same time! Someone went a little overboard on tracking devices!!!:/
    Adorable creatures and fantastic moment captured!!

    1. I agree, Christy, and thanks for your nice comment! Don’t know if you had heard but the authorities transplanted the white-tails at Ridgefield from a refuge up north, over the last few years. Apparently, the deer were in danger at the other refuge due to a dike that may fail. But the fallout that ensued was the coyotes at Ridgefield had to all be shot because they were attacking the white tailed fawns. I don’t have anything personal against these deer but from a photographer’s standpoint, I would much rather have the coyotes roaming the refuge than these blinged out deer. So the coyotes paid the price for these deer to live at Ridgefield. Maybe after the deer population grows, they will allow coyotes back in.

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